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Name North Carolina

Associated Records

Image of Souvenir facsimile of Robert E. Lee documents. - July 8, 1863 and April 10, 1865

Souvenir facsimile of Robert E. Lee documents. - July 8, 1863 and April 10, 1865

A 20th century souvenir facsimile of two documents on one folded sheet. The first one is General Robert E. Lee's letter to the President of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, dated July 8, 1863. The second document is General Lee's Farewell Address to the Confederate Army, dated April 10, 1865.

Image of Manuscript - not dated

Manuscript - not dated

A 13-page, loose-bound, manuscript titled "HISTORY OF THE BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY." Date of creation is unknown.

Image of Manuscript (typescript report) - not dated

Manuscript (typescript report) - not dated

A two-page report which is part of a continuing series of Blue Ridge Parkway Sites. Titled "BRINEGAR CABIN, BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY," the text concerns the home and lifestyles of Martin and Caroline (Joines) Brinegar.

Image of Manuscript (typescript report) - not dated

Manuscript (typescript report) - not dated

A three-page typescript titled "CAUDILL CABIN, BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY." This is also a continuance of a series of typescripts originally stapled together. Located in North Carolina, the preservation of our material culture, vernacular architecture and pioneer life is described.

Image of Letter from C. F. Mercer to Edward Watts - September 14, 1823

Letter from C. F. Mercer to Edward Watts - September 14, 1823

Letter from Charles Fenton Mercer, at Aldie, Loudoun County, Virginia, to Edward Watts, at Big Lick, Botetourt County, Virginia, soliciting his support for a project to construct canals on the Potomac River and the James River, describing the projects and explaining Virginia's interest in the Potomac Canal (Chesapeake and Ohio Canal). Transcription by English Showalter accompanies the document.

Image of Journal article - December 1953

Journal article - December 1953

An article from THE SCIENTIFIC MONTHLY, titled "The Teays River, Ancient Precursor of the East." The writer, Raymond E. Janssen, was professor of geology at Marshall College, Huntington, West Virginia. He maintains through documented research that The Teays was the "Mother" of present day river systems in the Appalachian region, especially the New River.

Image of 1859 Richardson's Almanac - 1859

1859 Richardson's Almanac - 1859

1859 Richardson's Almanac, published in Richmond, Virginia. Includes short sayings and stories; a table of the equation of time; poems; social advice; solar and lunar calendars; advice on planting; lists of the officials of the Commonwealth of Virginia; lists of officials of North Carolina; biography of John Warrock; and advertisements.

Image of Letter - July 27, 1831

Letter - July 27, 1831

Letter dated July 27, 1831 from H. R. [Harriet Randolph] postmarked Tallahassee, Florida, August 6, to Mrs. Cary Breckinridge (Emma G.), in Fincastle, Botetourt County, Virginia. Letter complains of weather, asks of friends, bemoans the death of a new neighbor, and expresses affection for her brother.

Image of Newspaper Article - May 1894

Newspaper Article - May 1894

Undetermined newspaper with a date of May 1894 (May 26, 1894 date found with a Mortuary Report on the reverse). The newspaper clipping has deteriorated, with the top in pieces. The author is unknown but relates his experience at "Yellow Tavern" on 11 May 1864. Background: On the morning of 11 May, 1862, Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's cavalrymen reached the abandoned stagecoach inn "Yellow Tavern" only 6 miles from Richmond. Outnumbered, Stuart deployed his two brigades on the Mountain Road where Union Gen. Philip Sheridan's command was advancing. Sheridan arrived before noon and for two hours deployed his seven brigades, but made his attack with four brigades. For two hours the Confederates res

Image of Beauregard at Drewry's Bluff & Petersburg - April 12, 1893

Beauregard at Drewry's Bluff & Petersburg - April 12, 1893

Johnson Hagood was born in South Carolina, educated at the South Carolina Military Academy (The Citadel), practiced law, and was a member of the state militia. He entered the Confederate service at the start of the Civil War and in 1862 was ranked as a Brigadier General. In early 1864 he was in charge of the Seventh Military District of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, commanded by Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard. When Beauregard was summoned north for the defense of Richmond, Hagood joined him. In 1893 Hagood wrote the narrative, here displayed, where he praises Beauregard and recounts the battles at Drewry's Bluff, Bermuda Hundred, and Petersburg. As shown on image page 27, th

Image of George Jefferson Hundley recollections - April 29, 1895

George Jefferson Hundley recollections - April 29, 1895

George Jefferson Hundley was born near Mobile, Alabama in 1838. On his mother's side he was the great-great-grandson of Peter Field Jefferson, who was an uncle of President Thomas Jefferson. Orphaned at an early age he was reared by relatives in Amelia County, Virginia. He studied law in Lexington, Virginia, and was licensed to practice in 1860. Hundley enlisted as a private in the 19th Virginia Infantry, where he was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant. He then changed over to the 5th Virginia Cavalry, which by the end of the war was absorbed into the 15th Virginia Cavalry. After the war, he taught school, established his law practice in Buckingham County, and served in the Virginia Senate. He was a

Image of Biography of Samuel H. Pulliam. - 1896

Biography of Samuel H. Pulliam. - 1896

Samuel H. Pulliam was born in Richmond, January 16, 1841. He was the son of Samuel T. Pulliam. Prior to the war, he was the recorder and presiding magistrate for the city. He graduated from Richmond College and attended the University of Virginia where he was graduated from several of its schools. In the spring of 1862 he enlisted in a battery of light artillery with Capt. S. Taylor Martin in command. The unit was made up of men from Virginia and North Carolina. Pulliam became an orderly sergeant. In October 1863 the men from North Carolina were transferred to a North Carolina battery. Pulliam recruited men for the unit from conscripts at Camp Lee. Pulliam advanced to First Lieutenant and fre

Image of Cockade City's Surrender by J. P. Williamson - June 17, 1894

Cockade City's Surrender by J. P. Williamson - June 17, 1894

The first four pages are newspaper strips that have been glued to scrap paper. The paper is from Bernard's old legal cases; the typing on the reverse is visible through the paper. At the bottom of the first page is a biography, written by Bernard, of Mr. Williamson. Inserted between the cut newspaper articles are photo images that are referred to within the text. Following the first four pages are four pages, titled "Addendum", that pertain to an entry within the newspaper article about a dead Confederate soldier. The next two pages are a duplicate of the newspaper article but in its original format. The last page is a small article that was on the reverse of the large newspaper article, and

Image of Flowers for Dead Heroes by Rev. William H. Platt - June 10, 1894

Flowers for Dead Heroes by Rev. William H. Platt - June 10, 1894

The twenty-eighth observance of Memorial Day is the basis of this newspaper article. The paper is badly damaged and split at the folds where it was folded and stored. The first part of the article pertains to the ceremony itself and is followed by the oration of the Reverend Platt. Petersburg was attacked thirty years ago by the Union cavalry of General Kautz, held at bay by 125 citizen soldiers under the command of Colonel Archer until reinforcements arrived from General Lee. The first commemoration of the 9th of June to honor the Confederate dead took place in 1866 and it has been observed for 28 years since. For the ceremony there was a large turnout. Several merchants closed their d

Image of Closing Days of the Army of Northern Virginia by William Mahone - July 25, 1895

Closing Days of the Army of Northern Virginia by William Mahone - July 25, 1895

Bernard has cut and pasted the first two pages of Mahone's transcribed letter, and has inserted a biography of Mahone, along with a third page (inserted by Bernard) to finish the biography. The letter then continues for 29 pages, where at the bottom of the page an addendum is inserted. The last two pages are by Bernard. Mahone was born in Southhampton County on December 1, 1826; he was educated at VMI, graduating in 1847. He taught school for two years, then became a civil engineer and surveyor on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad. He was chief engineer for the Fredericksburg & Orange plank road, also the Norfolk & Petersburg where he was elected its president, which position he held until

Image of J.E.L. (John E. Laughton)  Jr. Post Card  - June 17, 1891

J.E.L. (John E. Laughton) Jr. Post Card - June 17, 1891

J.E.L., Jr., gives Bernard a series of names, what units they were attached to, and some of their actions. J.V.L. McCreery was a sergeant in the 1st Company of the Richmond Howitzers. He says that the artillery supported by Mahone's Brigade on May 2nd, 1863, was Manly's North Carolina Battery, commanded by Captain Manly (Manly was the son of an ex-governor of N.C.), the 1st Co. of the Richmond Howitzers, commanded by Capt. Ed. S. McCarthy, Lieuts. R. M. Anderson and I. M. Nimmo, and Sergeants McCreery and Sclater. Two guns of each battery were engaged. Priv. Nat W. Selden was killed and Priv. George Richardson wounded. J.E.L. states that McCreery could give information on other actions, but

Image of G. Adolphus Boisseau Addendum letter - September 21, 1894

G. Adolphus Boisseau Addendum letter - September 21, 1894

The first page is a map sketch of the entrenched lines in the front of Petersburg made by Nathaniel Michler, a Colonel in the Engineers. The map does not match with the names of the places mentioned in the letter. The last or eighth page is the reverse of page seven. Mr. G. Adolphus Boisseau sent a letter (the addendum) dated September 21, 1893, in which he states that he was the little boy referred to by Captain Griffin in a letter sent to Bernard. He was 12 years old and living with his mother and three sisters at the Grove hotel at Dinwiddie Court House. His father, the late Robert G. Boisseau, and four of his sons were absent in the Confederate Army. On Thursday morning the Federal

Image of R. W. Jones letter - June 22, 1892 - June 22, 1892

R. W. Jones letter - June 22, 1892 - June 22, 1892

R.W. Jones writes Bernard that he has received his letter, and was much interested in his address on the Battle of the Crater. Jones addresses some questions posed by Bernard. 1. Question as to the time of the attack made by the Virginia Brigade, under Colonel Weisiger and directed by General Mahone, on the enemy who occupied the former Confederate line north of the Crater. Jones states that he had no watch, but it was before nine o'clock. He reasons that the mine exploded about daylight. Jones had been in the city of Petersburg the night before and was awakened by the noise and shock. He hurried to the Wilcox Farm and to his command (12th Virginia), which had received orders to move to

Image of Bernard writes on Petersburg - 1892 - assumed

Bernard writes on Petersburg - 1892 - assumed

Bernard writes about Petersburg, besieged in June 1864. It is not known if he is recalling his own memories or if he is writing a story. Many words within the 19 pages cannot be deciphered as the handwriting is difficult to read. There is no page 3, and the last page is only half of the page. The Federals reached Petersburg in June of 1864, and their lines extended from the Appomattox River to Colonel Avery's house. Only a few brigades opposed them: - Wise's and some North Carolina troops. They had given Union General Kautz a test of their metal on June 9th, when 150 of them held a cavalry brigade in check for an hour. They were often surrounded, and some fell with wounds while protecting

Image of J. E. Crow letter of November 16, 1892 - November 16, 1892

J. E. Crow letter of November 16, 1892 - November 16, 1892

John E. Crow writes to Bernard that he has received a letter from a Dr. C. B. Sanders of Acton, Massachusetts. The Doctor has read the "Rural Messenger" of November 5, 1892, in which he read with interest Crow's account of the Battle of the Crater, and thinks that he (Sanders) is the Lieutenant that Crow captured. Sanders thinks that Crow was a little strong in his account of how severe he was on the captured soldier. Sanders remembers giving up his sword and belt, he remembers Crow buckling it onto himself, but not at the point of a bayonet. Sanders then asked Crow to what regiment he belonged, and if he was from there. Crow told him he was of the 12th Virginia and said he was from there